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Let’s Tell the World the #TruthAboutTC

 
 
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There is no such thing as a good cancer

Thyroid cancer (TC) is sometimes described as “the good cancer” because its most common forms carry a favorable long-term prognosis if detected early.¹ This term, however, downplays the many physical and emotional challenges survivors may face due to the disease and side effects of certain treatments. Calling it "the good cancer" also neglects the fact that some people have more aggressive forms of TC.¹

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Thyroid cancer may be more common than you think

Last year, an estimated 44,000 people in the United States were diagnosed with TC, making it the 12th most common form of cancer. TC can affect people of any age or gender.

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Thyroid cancer survivors do not have to suffer in silence

There are many resources available to help survivors navigate their experiences with TC.

 

From advocacy organizations to support groups to social media, there are many ways to find help or be an ally to those in need.

Please join us in telling the #TruthAboutTC

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Dispelling the myths

Since 2015, the #TruthAboutTC campaign has united and supported TC survivors. It started with the insight that members of the TC community felt that their struggles were being minimized and ignored. Years later, the hashtag has taken on a life of its own, becoming a movement that unites people from all walks of life in a common cause: telling the world the truth about TC.

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Raising awareness

TC awareness takes many forms. For the public, it includes education about the risks of TC and the encouragement of early detection via regular neck checks. For TC survivors and their loved ones, it means a deeper understanding of the disease and how to cope with a lifetime of managing its challenges.

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Forming connections

The TC community brings together survivors, caregivers, advocacy networks, health care providers, and anyone touched by the disease. The strength of the bonds between these groups lies in our ability to connect people with fellow survivors and the resources they need. Whether you are searching for answers or sharing your solutions, you are welcome in this community.

 

Thyroid cancer resources

  • Learn the facts about thyroid cancer.

  • Connect with community support groups.

  • Find links to the latest guidelines for patients and health care providers.

  • Hear thyroid cancer experts share their perspectives.

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© 2022 by Eisai Inc. in collaboration with ThyCa: Thyroid Cancer Survivors' Association, Inc.; Light of Life Foundation; and Thyroid, Head and Neck Cancer (THANC) Foundation.

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References:

  1. ThyCa: Thyroid Cancer Survivors’ Association, Inc. Thyroid cancer basics. Accessed October 28, 2021. thyca.org/download/document/350/TCBasics.pdf 

  2. National Cancer Institute. Cancer Stat Facts: thyroid cancer. Accessed October 15, 2021. https://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/thyro.html 

This website contains information relating to various medical conditions and treatment. Such information is provided for educational purposes only and is not meant to be a substitute for the advice of a physician or other health care professionals. You should not use this information for diagnosing a health problem or disease. In order for you to make intelligent health care decisions, you should always consult with a physician or other health care provider for your, or your loved one’s, personal medical needs. All quotes included in this Web site represent the individual experience of some doctors, some patients, and their caregivers.